Male Submission Art

Art and visual erotica that depicts masculine submission.

We showcase beautiful imagery where men and other male-identified people are submissive subjects. We aim to challenge stereotypes of the "pathetic" submissive man. Learn more….

Your steward is maymay. Want to collaborate with me? It's easy: visit MaleSubmissionArt.com/submit or tag your Delicious.com bookmarks as for:MaleSubmissionArt! More ways to contribute….

Creative Commons License
Original work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License. We make a concerted effort to attribute works properly; please show us, and the artists whose work we feature, the same courtesy. Please redistribute this work; you are not stealing.

JanesGuide.com says we are 'quality and original'!

ztvf7jsh8a
Fri Jun 27
ztvf7jsh8a
Wed Jun 25
The kink/BDSM community isn’t trying to end rape culture. They’re trying to eroticize it. We already have a society in which relationship role models are so thoroughly intoxicated with abuser dynamics that most people don’t even know what consenting feels like. By celebrating this state of affairs and attempting to normalize the explicit eroticization of abuse with their endless protestations that they’re “just like everyone else,” what BDSM’ers are doing is in fact worse, not better, than at least feeling conflicted about it.

maymay, who self-identified as a Submissive in the BDSM community for almost a decade, was a subject (and is on the cover of) Dr. Newmahr’s ethnographic research book about the BDSM subculture, and who lead BDSM workshops and presentations at national BDSM conferences, and has one of the most visible blogs about the BDSM subculture on the Internet.

This perspective isn’t coming from “some outsider who doesn’t understand” what’s going on there. Check out these posts on their blog:

Kind of throws a wrench in the whole “kink shamers just don’t understand!!!111!!eleventy” argument, don’t it?

(via maymay)
ztvf7jsh8a
Mon Jun 23
There’s been some concern that [Predator Alert] tool harvests user data and stores it for undocumented purposes. We’ve spoken with some of the developers on the project, and they’ve offered up documentation that this isn’t true (read more in the FAQ here.) We still believe the tool is safe to use.

LifeHacker’s update to their Predator Alert Tool for OkCupid article.

I have only one thing to say about this. Dear Bitter BDSM’er Brigage: fuck you very much, your concern trolling is the problem. Like, a really big rape-apologizing problem.

(via maymay)
ztvf7jsh8a
Sat Jun 21
[F]rom the perspective of a vulnerable populace, namely people who are the targets of rape and physical abuse, a system that erodes the power of central authorities (such as website admins, or the cops) is a move towards safety, not away from it.

Excerpted from “Revisiting why “no moderation” is a feature, not a bug, in the Predator Alert Tools

This is a really important premise: if you think the police are here to protect you, you’re not the one being policed.

See also:

(via maymay)
ztvf7jsh8a
Thu Jun 19
ztvf7jsh8a
Wed Jun 18
maymay:

The other day, LifeHacker featured Predator Alert Tool for OkCupid on its homepage. Today, I received an email from the post’s author, stating that “the Predator Alert Tool post [is] doing well, but as you warned, some people have descended on it with comments and accusations about you specifically.” The email then detailed several accusations, all of which there are already copious amounts of information about in the archives of this blog (for instance, here), so I won’t go into detail.
I have something else to say.
I understand that many people don’t trust me. A lot of these people are self-proclaimed anti-violence advocates. So, what I don’t understand is why, in response to their distrust of me, these “anti-violence” advocates choose to tell folks not to install anti-violence apps that I wrote while AT THE SAME TIME refusing to acknowledge the fact that the tools’ functioning isn’t coupled to the tool-maker.
Such a prolonged tool-suppression & FUD campaign isn’t new or novel but isn’t typically associated w/”anti-violence” advocates, who tend to suffer from a dearth of tools already. Moreover, I know of no criticism of Predator Alert Tool that’s technical in nature.
If there is a technical criticism of Predator Alert Tool’s methodology/philosophy, I want to hear it but, years later, there have been none. In fact, as far as I’m aware, even the people who want to dissuade others from using (or, even knowing about the existence of) Predator Alert Tool ultimately concede that the tools themselves are good.
As a friend of mine said:

[Their behavior] creates a[n] obstruction between maymay’s anti-violence work and an important community of online users — an obstruction that, most of all, harms people who are less technically savvy and more vulnerable to both online and in-person violence, by limiting their access to (and even awareness of) resources they can use to protect themselves.

Given these facts, it is hard for me to believe that the people “concerned” about Predator Alert Tool users are in fact concerned for those user’s safety. And while I don’t believe all of these concern trolls are malicious, their lack of any technical criticism betrays 2 simple possible explanations.
First, they don’t really understand how Predator Alert Tool (or their Web browsers) work.
Or, what they’re actually concerned about is a longstanding social grudge against the toolmaker who’s receiving positive recognition/acknowledgement.
In either case, whether it be because of technical ignorance or reputation-based social capital, the people who are harmed by FUD (“Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt”) campaigns are always would-be users of tools that don’t get used when there is only potential gains to be had by using them. This is akin to telling people not to use (or even write about the existence of) hammers because hammer-makers are racists. And I’m not even arguing that hammer-makers are not racists, nor that I’m a trustworthy person. All I’m saying is that telling people to stop writing about the existence of hammers harms people who need to put nails into a wall and would find hammers useful in doing so.
Because that’s how tools (as opposed to belief systems) actually work in the real world: whether or not the hammer-maker is a racist doesn’t change the fact that the hammer still puts nails into walls. Likewise, whether or not I am “an abuser” does not change the fact that Predator Alert Tool is a useful anti-violence tool users of dating websites can add to their toolkits. This only seems far-fetched if you don’t actually know how Predator Alert Tool works (here’s yet-another explanation). But given that my collaborators and I have gone to great lengths to ensure both the ideas and the code that implements them are open-source, thoroughly documented, released to the public domain, not knowing how the tool works or spreading misinformation about how they work are ultimately deliberate choices.
Now, we’re familiar with the methodology of “smear & scare” from corporations, but that self-identified “anti-violence” advocates—feminists, even!—stoop to the same level is…well, it’s at least educational. :(
The ease w/which Predator Alert Tool can be copied (it’s just an idea after all) & the intransigence of its concern trolls’ unwillingness to so much as discuss mimicking Predator Alert Tool’s methods should at a MINIMUM reveal their priorities, if not intentions.
Anyway this whole thing is extremely frustrating & hurtful and it has been for years. By necessity, I’ve put an order of magnitude more effort into refuting the endlessly repetitive FUD & bullshit about Predator Alert Tool than in actually creating it. That’s very unfortunate because—empirically speaking—the only person who is able and willing to actually write tools like Predator Alert so far is me. Imagine how much more effective tools we could develop if we spent even a fraction of the effort we are currently wasting on this reputation “debate” on actually encoding the anti-violence methodology that Predator Alert Tool uses into every social network on the Internet?
And, I’m just saying, well, isn’t it a bit fishy that same people who have nothing bad to say about Predator Alert Tool itself seem hell-bent on burying it? It’s easy to understand why people may not like or trust someone else, but I find it hard to square how these same people claim to be supporters of anti-violence tools while at the same time preferring to bury discussion about anti-violence tools. Doubly so when those very same people are freely offered replicas of the same exact tool set but without the one thing they don’t like about it (me), and yet they still refuse to accept the offer.

So, after years of being homeless and writing Predator Alert Tool code while living out of my car, is it any wonder I get pissed off at these (often paid) full-time activists whose only contribution to a “debate” about Predator Alert Tool is actually not even about the tool itself?
Look, I can and do deal with a peanut gallery, but the so-called anti-violence advocates who have been hounding me over PAT for years are not harmless.
They are at best woefully ignorant about extreme fundamental premises of how modern technology works & at worst extremely dangerous bullies who epitomize the exact problem Predator Alert Tool is addressing right now, today.

maymay:

The other day, LifeHacker featured Predator Alert Tool for OkCupid on its homepage. Today, I received an email from the post’s author, stating that “the Predator Alert Tool post [is] doing well, but as you warned, some people have descended on it with comments and accusations about you specifically.” The email then detailed several accusations, all of which there are already copious amounts of information about in the archives of this blog (for instance, here), so I won’t go into detail.

I have something else to say.

I understand that many people don’t trust me. A lot of these people are self-proclaimed anti-violence advocates. So, what I don’t understand is why, in response to their distrust of me, these “anti-violence” advocates choose to tell folks not to install anti-violence apps that I wrote while AT THE SAME TIME refusing to acknowledge the fact that the tools’ functioning isn’t coupled to the tool-maker.

Such a prolonged tool-suppression & FUD campaign isn’t new or novel but isn’t typically associated w/”anti-violence” advocates, who tend to suffer from a dearth of tools already. Moreover, I know of no criticism of Predator Alert Tool that’s technical in nature.

If there is a technical criticism of Predator Alert Tool’s methodology/philosophy, I want to hear it but, years later, there have been none. In fact, as far as I’m aware, even the people who want to dissuade others from using (or, even knowing about the existence of) Predator Alert Tool ultimately concede that the tools themselves are good.

As a friend of mine said:

[Their behavior] creates a[n] obstruction between maymay’s anti-violence work and an important community of online users — an obstruction that, most of all, harms people who are less technically savvy and more vulnerable to both online and in-person violence, by limiting their access to (and even awareness of) resources they can use to protect themselves.

Given these facts, it is hard for me to believe that the people “concerned” about Predator Alert Tool users are in fact concerned for those user’s safety. And while I don’t believe all of these concern trolls are malicious, their lack of any technical criticism betrays 2 simple possible explanations.

  1. First, they don’t really understand how Predator Alert Tool (or their Web browsers) work.
  2. Or, what they’re actually concerned about is a longstanding social grudge against the toolmaker who’s receiving positive recognition/acknowledgement.

In either case, whether it be because of technical ignorance or reputation-based social capital, the people who are harmed by FUD (“Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt”) campaigns are always would-be users of tools that don’t get used when there is only potential gains to be had by using them. This is akin to telling people not to use (or even write about the existence of) hammers because hammer-makers are racists. And I’m not even arguing that hammer-makers are not racists, nor that I’m a trustworthy person. All I’m saying is that telling people to stop writing about the existence of hammers harms people who need to put nails into a wall and would find hammers useful in doing so.

Because that’s how tools (as opposed to belief systems) actually work in the real world: whether or not the hammer-maker is a racist doesn’t change the fact that the hammer still puts nails into walls. Likewise, whether or not I am “an abuser” does not change the fact that Predator Alert Tool is a useful anti-violence tool users of dating websites can add to their toolkits. This only seems far-fetched if you don’t actually know how Predator Alert Tool works (here’s yet-another explanation). But given that my collaborators and I have gone to great lengths to ensure both the ideas and the code that implements them are open-source, thoroughly documented, released to the public domain, not knowing how the tool works or spreading misinformation about how they work are ultimately deliberate choices.

Now, we’re familiar with the methodology of “smear & scare” from corporations, but that self-identified “anti-violence” advocates—feminists, even!—stoop to the same level is…well, it’s at least educational. :(

The ease w/which Predator Alert Tool can be copied (it’s just an idea after all) & the intransigence of its concern trolls’ unwillingness to so much as discuss mimicking Predator Alert Tool’s methods should at a MINIMUM reveal their priorities, if not intentions.

Anyway this whole thing is extremely frustrating & hurtful and it has been for years. By necessity, I’ve put an order of magnitude more effort into refuting the endlessly repetitive FUD & bullshit about Predator Alert Tool than in actually creating it. That’s very unfortunate because—empirically speaking—the only person who is able and willing to actually write tools like Predator Alert so far is me. Imagine how much more effective tools we could develop if we spent even a fraction of the effort we are currently wasting on this reputation “debate” on actually encoding the anti-violence methodology that Predator Alert Tool uses into every social network on the Internet?

And, I’m just saying, well, isn’t it a bit fishy that same people who have nothing bad to say about Predator Alert Tool itself seem hell-bent on burying it? It’s easy to understand why people may not like or trust someone else, but I find it hard to square how these same people claim to be supporters of anti-violence tools while at the same time preferring to bury discussion about anti-violence tools. Doubly so when those very same people are freely offered replicas of the same exact tool set but without the one thing they don’t like about it (me), and yet they still refuse to accept the offer.

So, after years of being homeless and writing Predator Alert Tool code while living out of my car, is it any wonder I get pissed off at these (often paid) full-time activists whose only contribution to a “debate” about Predator Alert Tool is actually not even about the tool itself?

Look, I can and do deal with a peanut gallery, but the so-called anti-violence advocates who have been hounding me over PAT for years are not harmless.

They are at best woefully ignorant about extreme fundamental premises of how modern technology works & at worst extremely dangerous bullies who epitomize the exact problem Predator Alert Tool is addressing right now, today.

ztvf7jsh8a
Mon Jun 16
maymay:

unquietpirate:


My parting (terrifying) thought: These are just the cases where the victim had the courage and family support to come forward publicly to accuse their attackers – even in their positions of power and authority within the church and community. Police and prosecutors know that most of these crimes go unreported – especially within the church. How many more victims suffer in silence every day? If I were still a praying man, I would be praying that the poor victims of these monsters are able to get the best counseling available OUTSIDE the typical “Christian Counseling” found within the church. 
- "25 More Shocking Arrests": Pastors Charged with Sex Crimes

The Predator Alert Tool project recently released a Predator Alert Tool for Christian Mingle, a dating site that offers to help “find God’s match for you.” (But only if you are either a “man seeking a woman” or a “woman seeking a man.”) In their release notes for PAT-CM, developer maymay noted:

This tool is based on the popular Predator Alert Tool for FetLife, a dating website for the BDSM/leather/sadomasochistic subculture and, I have to say, the code is almost identical for both websites. Coincidence? I think not. :P

Unsurprisingly, Christian culture and BDSM culture have more in common than just how they design their dating sites. In the context of fighting sexual violence, the most salient similarity is the one quoted at the beginning of this post: 
Christian communities — especially of some of the more extremist denominations — are often small, insular, tight-knit social enclaves led by unscrupulous abusers. In both BDSM sub-cultures and evangelical Christian sub-cultures, these leaders use their power to foster a sense of vulnerability and embattlement amongst their followers, training them to believe that Christians/”kinksters” are an oppressed group. Followers are told that they can’t trust anyone outside “the community” to understand or treat them fairly; and that taking their problems to outsiders, rather than having them addressed internally by the community’s (corrupt) leadership, will only give mainstream society more ammunition with which to “oppress” them further. In short: Both communities suffer from higher-than-average rates of sexual violence, often perpetrated by leaders in those communities, and survivors have little recourse because they have no one to turn to for help besides that same abusive leadership.  
There has been a great deal of work done internally, both in the BDSM Scene and among Christian church communities, to try and address the epidemic of sexual violence in their midst — but that work cannot progress as long as information about sexual violence remains silo’ed between survivors and community leaders who would prefer to silence them. The Predator Alert Tools are important because they takes reporting, discussing, sharing information, and arbitrating the consequences of sexual violence out of the hands of “the authorities” and distribute it to the community as a whole.For this reason, Predator Alert Tool for Christian Mingle might be the most important PAT since PAT-Fetlife for helping protect potential victims from powerful predators right now, today. 

I could probably say something really snarky about the BDSM Scene here, but I’ll just link to this damning BDSM community consent survey and leave it at that.

maymay:

unquietpirate:

My parting (terrifying) thought: These are just the cases where the victim had the courage and family support to come forward publicly to accuse their attackers – even in their positions of power and authority within the church and community. Police and prosecutors know that most of these crimes go unreported – especially within the church. How many more victims suffer in silence every day? If I were still a praying man, I would be praying that the poor victims of these monsters are able to get the best counseling available OUTSIDE the typical “Christian Counseling” found within the church. 

"25 More Shocking Arrests": Pastors Charged with Sex Crimes

The Predator Alert Tool project recently released a Predator Alert Tool for Christian Mingle, a dating site that offers to help “find God’s match for you.” (But only if you are either a “man seeking a woman” or a “woman seeking a man.”) 

In their release notes for PAT-CM, developer maymay noted:

This tool is based on the popular Predator Alert Tool for FetLife, a dating website for the BDSM/leather/sadomasochistic subculture and, I have to say, the code is almost identical for both websites. Coincidence? I think not. :P

Unsurprisingly, Christian culture and BDSM culture have more in common than just how they design their dating sites. In the context of fighting sexual violence, the most salient similarity is the one quoted at the beginning of this post:

Christian communities — especially of some of the more extremist denominations — are often small, insular, tight-knit social enclaves led by unscrupulous abusers. In both BDSM sub-cultures and evangelical Christian sub-cultures, these leaders use their power to foster a sense of vulnerability and embattlement amongst their followers, training them to believe that Christians/”kinksters” are an oppressed group. Followers are told that they can’t trust anyone outside “the community” to understand or treat them fairly; and that taking their problems to outsiders, rather than having them addressed internally by the community’s (corrupt) leadership, will only give mainstream society more ammunition with which to “oppress” them further. 

In short: Both communities suffer from higher-than-average rates of sexual violence, often perpetrated by leaders in those communities, and survivors have little recourse because they have no one to turn to for help besides that same abusive leadership.  

There has been a great deal of work done internally, both in the BDSM Scene and among Christian church communities, to try and address the epidemic of sexual violence in their midst — but that work cannot progress as long as information about sexual violence remains silo’ed between survivors and community leaders who would prefer to silence them. The Predator Alert Tools are important because they takes reporting, discussing, sharing information, and arbitrating the consequences of sexual violence out of the hands of “the authorities” and distribute it to the community as a whole.

For this reason, Predator Alert Tool for Christian Mingle might be the most important PAT since PAT-Fetlife for helping protect potential victims from powerful predators right now, today. 

I could probably say something really snarky about the BDSM Scene here, but I’ll just link to this damning BDSM community consent survey and leave it at that.

ztvf7jsh8a
maymay:

Tonight’s update to the Predator Alert Tool for Twitter adds a feature inspired by the award-winning Circle of 6 anti-violence iPhone app to help cyberbullying targets call for help when they need it:
 This screenshot shows a small excerpt from a four hour long cyberbullying dogpile by @nullvoid9 on Twitter, with the new “Get help from your Support Circle” link under their tweet.
Your Support Circle are other Twitter users who you know and trust to publicly back you up when you’re getting bullied on Twitter. When you’re enduring cyberbullying on Twitter, you can use Predator Alert Tool for Twitter to get help from your Support Circle in one click. Everyone in your Support Circle receives a Direct Message asking them to help you, with a link to the harassing messages.
Just the other day, I was harassed on Twitter for more than 4 straight hours by a clique of pop social justice cyberbullies. As a result of that, I spent all night yesterday and all day today trying to come up with more ways to literally encode anti-bullying mechanisms into the technology that I use. As I said then:
[I]f we want to meaningfully address #cyberbullying we need to:
build communication tools for target(s) & supporter(s) to connect, FAST.
Change the way we think about abuse and #cyberbullying (and violence) from “a thing bullies do” to “an experience that a target endures,” and
nurture mutually meaningful relationships w/other individual people (as opposed to “support causes for demographics”).
For me personally, this means continuing to literally encode these goals in Predator Alert Tool code. You can help by sharing ideas with me. Until you have an idea to share you can also help by sharing links to work I already did to encode ideas by @unquietpirate & others in code. Those links are easy to find on the Internet, e.g., on LifeHacker and at [my homepage], maymay.net.
The “Support Circle” feature I added to Predator Alert Tool for Twitter today is part of me enacting goal number 1: build communication tools for target(s) and supporter(s) to connect, fast.
As usual, sending me bug reports and feature requests are both equally appreciated, as are donations of food to keep me hacking.

maymay:

Tonight’s update to the Predator Alert Tool for Twitter adds a feature inspired by the award-winning Circle of 6 anti-violence iPhone app to help cyberbullying targets call for help when they need it:

This screenshot shows a small excerpt from a four hour long cyberbullying dogpile by @nullvoid9 on Twitter, with the new “Get help from your Support Circle” link under their tweet.

Your Support Circle are other Twitter users who you know and trust to publicly back you up when you’re getting bullied on Twitter. When you’re enduring cyberbullying on Twitter, you can use Predator Alert Tool for Twitter to get help from your Support Circle in one click. Everyone in your Support Circle receives a Direct Message asking them to help you, with a link to the harassing messages.

Just the other day, I was harassed on Twitter for more than 4 straight hours by a clique of pop social justice cyberbullies. As a result of that, I spent all night yesterday and all day today trying to come up with more ways to literally encode anti-bullying mechanisms into the technology that I use. As I said then:

[I]f we want to meaningfully address #cyberbullying we need to:

  1. build communication tools for target(s) & supporter(s) to connect, FAST.
  2. Change the way we think about abuse and #cyberbullying (and violence) from “a thing bullies do” to “an experience that a target endures,” and
  3. nurture mutually meaningful relationships w/other individual people (as opposed to “support causes for demographics”).

For me personally, this means continuing to literally encode these goals in Predator Alert Tool code. You can help by sharing ideas with me. Until you have an idea to share you can also help by sharing links to work I already did to encode ideas by @unquietpirate & others in code. Those links are easy to find on the Internet, e.g., on LifeHacker and at [my homepage], maymay.net.

The “Support Circle” feature I added to Predator Alert Tool for Twitter today is part of me enacting goal number 1: build communication tools for target(s) and supporter(s) to connect, fast.

As usual, sending me bug reports and feature requests are both equally appreciated, as are donations of food to keep me hacking.

ztvf7jsh8a
Sat Jun 14
ztvf7jsh8a
Thu Jun 12