Male Submission Art

Art and visual erotica that depicts masculine submission.

We showcase beautiful imagery where men and other male-identified people are submissive subjects. We aim to challenge stereotypes of the "pathetic" submissive man. Learn more….

Your steward is maymay. Want to collaborate with me? It's easy: visit MaleSubmissionArt.com/submit or tag your Delicious.com bookmarks as for:MaleSubmissionArt! More ways to contribute….

Creative Commons License
Original work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License. We make a concerted effort to attribute works properly; please show us, and the artists whose work we feature, the same courtesy. Please redistribute this work; you are not stealing.

JanesGuide.com says we are 'quality and original'!

ztvf7jsh8a
Sat Jun 7
maymay:

The Predator Alert Tool for ChristianMingle, or PAT-ChristianMingle, is a tool that alerts you of profiles on Spark Networks’ ChristianMingle dating site belonging to people who have reportedly violated others’ consent, such as through sexual assault or rape. This tool is based on the popular Predator Alert Tool for FetLife, a dating website for the BDSM/leather/sadomasochistic subculture and, I have to say, the code is almost identical for both websites. Coincidence? I think not. :P

The Predator Alert Tool for ChristianMingle (PAT-ChristianMingle) empowers Internet users like you to anonymously report harassment, rape, and other abuses they have experienced at the hands of a person with a ChristianMingle account. Your report is then automatically disemminated to other PAT-ChristianMingle users, as well as being published on the open Internet.
Additionally:
While browsing ChristianMingle, the Predator Alert Tool will visually highlight any user profile you encounter that has allegedly violated another person’s consent. Click through to the user’s profile for a complete listing of reported consent violations.
Each time you load a user’s ChristianMingle profile, that user’s profile picture is scanned against the United States’s Sex Offender Registry using the facial recognition service provided by CreepShield.com, and the most likely match is shown to you:

I coded this one blind, meaning I was not online when I wrote it. It works in my tests but I’d love for people to try this out on their actual accounts and let me know how well it works. Report bugs here.
Also, by the way, this makes seven Predator Alert Tools. Seven. Total budget: $0. Still.
And my government still thinks I don’t deserve to eat. Fuck.

maymay:

The Predator Alert Tool for ChristianMingle, or PAT-ChristianMingle, is a tool that alerts you of profiles on Spark Networks’ ChristianMingle dating site belonging to people who have reportedly violated others’ consent, such as through sexual assault or rape. This tool is based on the popular Predator Alert Tool for FetLife, a dating website for the BDSM/leather/sadomasochistic subculture and, I have to say, the code is almost identical for both websites. Coincidence? I think not. :P

The Predator Alert Tool for ChristianMingle (PAT-ChristianMingle) empowers Internet users like you to anonymously report harassment, rape, and other abuses they have experienced at the hands of a person with a ChristianMingle account. Your report is then automatically disemminated to other PAT-ChristianMingle users, as well as being published on the open Internet.

Additionally:

  • While browsing ChristianMingle, the Predator Alert Tool will visually highlight any user profile you encounter that has allegedly violated another person’s consent. Click through to the user’s profile for a complete listing of reported consent violations.
  • Each time you load a user’s ChristianMingle profile, that user’s profile picture is scanned against the United States’s Sex Offender Registry using the facial recognition service provided by CreepShield.com, and the most likely match is shown to you:

I coded this one blind, meaning I was not online when I wrote it. It works in my tests but I’d love for people to try this out on their actual accounts and let me know how well it works. Report bugs here.

Also, by the way, this makes seven Predator Alert Tools. Seven. Total budget: $0. Still.

And my government still thinks I don’t deserve to eat. Fuck.

ztvf7jsh8a
Thu Jun 5

Despite many “anti-bullying” campaigns, online harassment and cyberbullying are prevalent behaviors. Most anti-abuse efforts fail because they tend to focus on appeals to authority. The now-ubiquitous “Report Abuse” buttons on social networking websites like Twitter are one such example, yet their ubiquity have not curbed the behaviors or harm they purport to address or mitigate.

We believe these efforts have failed because cyberbullying and online harassment are cultural, not technological, problems inherited from a society where coercion and abusive behavior offline are normalized. Abusive behavior is no more successfully mitigated in the physical world through appeals to authority than it is likely to be mitigated in the online world through the same sorts of appeals. This is doubly true in an environment where the biggest “bullies” are the authorities themselves:

People who are being abused have no recourse, because the systems that are supposedly set up to help them actually harm them further. Victims of domestic violence who call the police are often jailed themselves, because the police are required to arrest somebody and choose to arrest the ‘hysterical’ victim over the seemingly ‘calm and rational’ abuser. When I was in grade school, this happened on a regular basis: Kids threw rocks at me, and then I got sent to the principals office, because I punched one of them. It didn’t matter that I punched them because they were THROWING ROCKS AT ME. It happens at all scales, including and especially on the Internet.

@maymaymx, Predator Alert Tool for Twitter developer

To put it less diplomatically, the Internet has been doing “report abuse” wrong because its admins are corrupt. The “Report Abuse” button should go to the rest of the user community, not just the site admins.

Predator Alert Tool for Twitter is the Twitter part of an Internet-wide anti-abuse effort to change the way people think about bullying, violence, and abuse. Rather than creating an opaque appeal to authority that silences people (such as current “Report Abuse” forms), it sends a radically transparent and contextualized signal boost to friends and supporters of the person who bullies and abusers target. Using Predator Alert Tool for Twitter, the targeted user can ask for help and support at the same time as they are alerting the rest of the Twitter user community about behavior they have experienced as abusive.

I began writing some further concept documentation for Predator Alert Tool for Twitter, because I don’t sound enough like a broken record for most people to even begin to understand what the hell I’m doing, yet. It’s really lonely being so (intentionally) misunderstood. (via maymay)
ztvf7jsh8a
Fri May 30

The disparity in resource allocation to this problem should tell you something about priorities and efficacy. Observe:

maymay:

Just a reminder that this post…

maymay:

Yesterday, there were four dating websites that had Predator Alert Tools. Today, there are five:

As before, these tools are inspired by the academic works of David Lisak and Paul Miller, “Repeat Rape and Multiple Offending Among Undetected Rapists,” 2002, and the academic works of Stephanie K. McWhorter, “Reports of Rape Reperpetration by Newly Enlisted Male Navy Personnel,” 2009. See “Repeat Rape: How do they get away with it?" for details.

I’ve also just published a brief tutorial explaining how you can make a Predator Alert Tool for any (and every) Facebook app. Because, again, there is no good excuse for not building sexual violence prevention tools into every social network on the Internet.

Also, yes, Facebook is a “dating website.” Not only are there speculations that Mark Zuckerberg initially created Facebook so he would have an easier time picking up girls, everything Facebook does facilitates online dating: finding, meeting, and interacting with new people, comparing common interests or “Likes,” and posting pretty photos of yourself.

Please remember:

This project is 100% volunteer-run. There are no paid developers. There is no staff.

There is also no budget.

It takes time, heart, and material resources to ensure that this software continues to function, much less is improved on over time. If you can afford to do so, please consider making a donation in the form of food or money to its houseless, nomadic developer at Cyberbusking.org. Thank you very much.

…is outdated, because now there is another Predator Alert Tool, this time for Twitter, the most decentralized, user-controlled PAT yet.

That makes 6 tools. Six different Predator Alert Tools, in less than two years, developed using a grand total budget of $0, thousands of lines of code in four different languages written by one person, whose government insists does not deserve to eat.

But, please, do tell us more about how sexual violence online is something you’re “working really hard to address.” It’s not like you have more resources than a homeless person who lives off donated food. Oh, wait….

THERE’S NO GOOD EXCUSE FOR NOT WRITING SEXUAL VIOLENCE PREVENTION TOOLS INTO EVERY SOCIAL NETWORK ON THE INTERNET.

ztvf7jsh8a
Thu May 29

"Consent as a Felt Sense" is not about law, so why does everyone keep talking about The Law?

maymay:

I want to clarify something. But, since every time I speak publicly certain people deem it their personal moral crusade to deliberately misinterpret and decontextualize what I have to say, I’m going to let this other blog post written by this other person clarify for me:

My friends Unquietpirate and Maymay wrote this controversy-provoking article, “You Can Take It Back: Consent as a Felt Sense”

To me, the most important thing they point to is that the internet social justice world has so far on the whole done a poor job of distinguishing between ethical and legal frameworks for discussing rape and sexual assault.

[…F]or survivors, the terminology of rape can be very useful and empowering, sometimes, but also very limiting and confusing other times.  I’ve read writings by survivors who benefited from using the word “rape” to describe what happened to them.  I’ve also read about the process of trying to decide whether an experience fits into the “rape” box or the “not-rape” box being a confusing and demoralizing obstacle in dealing with that experience, both intra- and interpersonally.

In a legal proceeding, the whole point is to decide whether or not it was rape, according to some very specific definition written by some politician or lawyer.

Outside of a legal proceeding, there may be times when it’s way easier and more useful to ask “was it OK?” than “was it rape?”

It doesn’t seem at all wierd to say that if you do something with someone, and they don’t feel ok about it, either in the moment or at any point in the future, the thing you did wasn’t entirely ok.

Maymay and unquietpirate have zeroed in on one very significant example of this misplaced emphasis on legal rather than ethical thinking about rape.  When thinking about sexual ethics, it seems fairly uncontroversial that one would want to think about whether a particular sexual encounter might be something that one party would regret later, and if so, maybe not do it.  It only becomes controversial when we try to shoehorn this reasonable ethical principle into the language of “consent,” as Maymay and Unquietpirate have done.  I’m not suggesting that this was an error on their part: they clearly chose their language with the specific intent of being controversial, for various valid rhetorical reasons.

I’m posting this because, ever since we posted “You Can Take It Back: Consent as a Felt Sense,” there’s been an ongoing controversy about the ideas therein. When I published my Radical Ethicism followup, said controversy grew. But when I published my most recent take, “Wherein MRAs and Feminists both agree that legalistic status quo on “consent” must not be challenged,” people’s (air-quotes) “interpretations” have jumped the shark. (Air quotes because, again, most of these are clearly deliberate misinterpretations—once is a mistake, twice is a problem, three times is a decision.)

Most folks seem to think I was just kidding about the original piece. So, I want to clarify: I was then and am now totally serious and meant every word.

At least for me, the reason I am so enamored with the rhetorical approach of dissolving current consent discourse is because it is so damned useful in highlighting the obsessive legalism with which people approach what the quoted blogger calls “sexual ethics.” And my point in highlighting that obsession is to showcase that, in fact, not even the people who appointed themselves to the task of creating a more “just” society have actually thought about sexual ethics at all. (I’m talking about pro-consent feminists.) The fact that these people’s first and ongoing response to our “Consent as a Felt Sense” essay centers legalism when the explicit purpose of the essay is to decenter it should be all the evidence you need.

Unless you, too, don’t really care about sexual ethics (to use our words from the essay: “care about not violating consent”), because what you really care about, or care about more than that is whether you’re going to find yourself on the right or wrong side of The Law (to use our words from the essay: what you care about is “not getting in trouble for violating consent”). If that describes what you do, regardless of what you say, then I do actually think the world would be better off if you killed yourself.

ztvf7jsh8a
Predator Alert Tool for Twitter empowers you to document harassment on Twitter and alert others about predatory users. What constitutes “predatory” is entirely up to you; the software makes no claim as to what behavior hurts you. Predator Alert Tool for Twitter can be used to, for example, flag trolls, warn your followers about rapists, or to expose cops and snitches who use social media. Moreover, what you share can not be censored or removed by Twitter itself because Twitter is never informed of your report.

Predator Alert Tool for Twitter is now available as a WordPress plugin.

Here are some more screenshots of PAT Twitter in action. Please spread the word.

(via maymay)
ztvf7jsh8a
Thu May 22
maymay:

I released the code for my proof-of-concept and first functional prototype of the Predator Alert Tool for Twitter to the public domain. If you want to try it out yourself, you can use the public Predator Alert Tool for Twitter facilitator at https://pat-twitter.herokuapp.com. I’ve seeded it with a demonstration warnlist called “Reputation-addicted putzes” onto which I’ve placed the Twitter accounts of @JillianCYork and @CharlieGlickman, as starters. Here are some screenshots.
 This screenshot shows the Predator Alert Tool for Twitter displaying a “Predator Alert” from a public warnlist on the user profile of @JillianCYork, who was added to the list “Reputation-addicted putzes.” in the current version 0.1 of PAT-Twitter.
Using Predator Alert Tool for Twitter, any and all links to the profile, tweets, or lists of a user who is on a Predator Alert warnlist you’ve subscribed to are redboxed. In infamous Predator Alert Tool style, click through to their profile to view the alert’s details.
The Predator Alert Tool for Twitter is distributed to users through “facilitator” websites that keep copies of public data (and only public data). These facilitators also allow you to browse public warnlists and view alerts attached to specific Twitter user accounts. These alerts can not be removed or edited, ever.
Feature requests, patches, and bug reports for Predator Alert Tool for Twitter are welcome. Copying is encouraged. Don’t trust me; run your own server for your community and add me to as many warnlists as you want.
Just as before, I welcome your anger, too.

maymay:

I released the code for my proof-of-concept and first functional prototype of the Predator Alert Tool for Twitter to the public domain. If you want to try it out yourself, you can use the public Predator Alert Tool for Twitter facilitator at https://pat-twitter.herokuapp.com. I’ve seeded it with a demonstration warnlist called “Reputation-addicted putzes” onto which I’ve placed the Twitter accounts of @JillianCYork and @CharlieGlickman, as starters. Here are some screenshots.

  • This screenshot shows the Predator Alert Tool for Twitter displaying a “Predator Alert” from a public warnlist on the user profile of @JillianCYork, who was added to the list “Reputation-addicted putzes.” in the current version 0.1 of PAT-Twitter.
  • Using Predator Alert Tool for Twitter, any and all links to the profile, tweets, or lists of a user who is on a Predator Alert warnlist you've subscribed to are redboxed. In infamous Predator Alert Tool style, click through to their profile to view the alert's details.

    Using Predator Alert Tool for Twitter, any and all links to the profile, tweets, or lists of a user who is on a Predator Alert warnlist you’ve subscribed to are redboxed. In infamous Predator Alert Tool style, click through to their profile to view the alert’s details.

  • The Predator Alert Tool for Twitter is distributed to users through "facilitator" websites that keep copies of public data (and only public data). These facilitators also allow you to browse public warnlists and view alerts attached to specific Twitter user accounts. These alerts can not be removed or edited, ever.

    The Predator Alert Tool for Twitter is distributed to users through “facilitator” websites that keep copies of public data (and only public data). These facilitators also allow you to browse public warnlists and view alerts attached to specific Twitter user accounts. These alerts can not be removed or edited, ever.

Feature requests, patches, and bug reports for Predator Alert Tool for Twitter are welcome. Copying is encouraged. Don’t trust me; run your own server for your community and add me to as many warnlists as you want.

Just as before, I welcome your anger, too.

ztvf7jsh8a
Wed May 21
Relevant to FetLife, too, as you’ll see from the text. (It all comes together at the end.)
unquietpirate:

maymay:

I’m still hacking away on Predator Alert Tool for Twitter, but I’ve just finished putting some final wax and polish on the user interface for warnlist privacy options. What’s really exciting about this is that, unlike Twitter itself, in Predator Alert Tool for Twitter, “private” actually means what it says on the tin.
When you make a “Private” Twitter list, Twitter claims that “only you can access this list.” But we know that’s not entirely true. Twitter themselves can also always access that so-called “private” list. Moreover, if your Twitter account gets hijacked by someone else, they can also access that list.
In contrast, when you make a “Private” PAT Twitter warnlist, not even Twitter themselves, nor anyone accessing your Twitter account can access that list. That’s because the warnlist you make private never leaves your Web browser.
Predator Alert Tool for Twitter is a private-by-default, public-by-effort application in the sense that when you mark some of your data “private,” it never leaves your Web browser without your knowing about it. Not even Twitter can read your private lists. Because that’s what privacy is supposed to mean.
What’s important to understand here is that when you “delete” something from a service like Twitter or Facebook, you’re not actually deleting anything. All you’re doing is asking them, to please not show that to anyone anymore. But those companies still keep a copy of the thing you supposedly “deleted.” Y’know, for their records. They’ve been doing that ever since the start. And if you thought you had embarrassing photos on Facebook, have you checked FetLife lately? Yup, FetLife is even worse in this respect.
Another consideration showcased in the Predator Alert Tool for Twitter screenshot shown here is the notion of “data portability,” or the idea that “you can take your data with you wherever you go.” That’s why each warnlist you make also includes an “Export” button, which gives you a plain text file containing a backup of your warnlist’s data, including all of the Predator Alerts you added to it. If you use multiple browsers, you can export a list you created in Mozilla Firefox and import it into Google Chrome, for example. And when you do that, it stays in that browser.
You can also use the “Export” feature to share warnlists in a truly private fashion, such as by sending the exported list to a friend over encrypted email. Of course, your privacy is ultimately your responsibility. The point here is that Predator Alert Tool for Twitter is designed to help you maintain that privacy with as little effort as possible. Inversely, the MO of sites I’m building Predator Alert Tools for, like Twitter, Facebook, FetLife, and OkCupid are all about violating your privacy.
So, there’s that.
For a higher-level overview of the upcoming Predator Alert Tool for Twitter, see my user interface preview. And, as always, donations (especially of food) are appreciated. Okay, back to work I go.

This is the coolest.
I’m about to take a sneak peek at the new PAT-Twitter interface. I’m excited about PAT-Twitter for a number of reasons, but one of the most exciting is that this is the first Predator Alert Tool that’s “unhosted.” That means it’s an app that gives you more control over how you interact with the Internet, but it doesn’t do that via some corporate or even open-source centralized system. Your private data isn’t stored where it can be hacked into by your ex, snooped on by untrustworthy admin, or even requisitioned by the NSA. It’s located entirely in your browser, on your own computer only, unless you choose to share it with other PAT-Twitter users in a direct peer-to-peer way. 
This kind of privacy and data portability is important generally speaking, but it’s especially essential to allow vulnerable people — such as survivors of sexual violence — share information with each other safely.

Relevant to FetLife, too, as you’ll see from the text. (It all comes together at the end.)

unquietpirate:

maymay:

I’m still hacking away on Predator Alert Tool for Twitter, but I’ve just finished putting some final wax and polish on the user interface for warnlist privacy options. What’s really exciting about this is that, unlike Twitter itself, in Predator Alert Tool for Twitter, “private” actually means what it says on the tin.

When you make a “Private” Twitter list, Twitter claims that “only you can access this list.” But we know that’s not entirely true. Twitter themselves can also always access that so-called “private” list. Moreover, if your Twitter account gets hijacked by someone else, they can also access that list.

In contrast, when you make a “Private” PAT Twitter warnlist, not even Twitter themselves, nor anyone accessing your Twitter account can access that list. That’s because the warnlist you make private never leaves your Web browser.

Predator Alert Tool for Twitter is a private-by-default, public-by-effort application in the sense that when you mark some of your data “private,” it never leaves your Web browser without your knowing about it. Not even Twitter can read your private lists. Because that’s what privacy is supposed to mean.

What’s important to understand here is that when you “delete” something from a service like Twitter or Facebook, you’re not actually deleting anything. All you’re doing is asking them, to please not show that to anyone anymore. But those companies still keep a copy of the thing you supposedly “deleted.” Y’know, for their records. They’ve been doing that ever since the start. And if you thought you had embarrassing photos on Facebook, have you checked FetLife lately? Yup, FetLife is even worse in this respect.

Another consideration showcased in the Predator Alert Tool for Twitter screenshot shown here is the notion of “data portability,” or the idea that “you can take your data with you wherever you go.” That’s why each warnlist you make also includes an “Export” button, which gives you a plain text file containing a backup of your warnlist’s data, including all of the Predator Alerts you added to it. If you use multiple browsers, you can export a list you created in Mozilla Firefox and import it into Google Chrome, for example. And when you do that, it stays in that browser.

You can also use the “Export” feature to share warnlists in a truly private fashion, such as by sending the exported list to a friend over encrypted email. Of course, your privacy is ultimately your responsibility. The point here is that Predator Alert Tool for Twitter is designed to help you maintain that privacy with as little effort as possible. Inversely, the MO of sites I’m building Predator Alert Tools for, like Twitter, Facebook, FetLife, and OkCupid are all about violating your privacy.

So, there’s that.

For a higher-level overview of the upcoming Predator Alert Tool for Twitter, see my user interface preview. And, as always, donations (especially of food) are appreciated. Okay, back to work I go.

This is the coolest.

I’m about to take a sneak peek at the new PAT-Twitter interface. I’m excited about PAT-Twitter for a number of reasons, but one of the most exciting is that this is the first Predator Alert Tool that’s “unhosted.” That means it’s an app that gives you more control over how you interact with the Internet, but it doesn’t do that via some corporate or even open-source centralized system. Your private data isn’t stored where it can be hacked into by your ex, snooped on by untrustworthy admin, or even requisitioned by the NSA. It’s located entirely in your browser, on your own computer only, unless you choose to share it with other PAT-Twitter users in a direct peer-to-peer way. 

This kind of privacy and data portability is important generally speaking, but it’s especially essential to allow vulnerable people — such as survivors of sexual violence — share information with each other safely.

ztvf7jsh8a
Tue May 20
maymay:

The most recent report filed in the Predator Alert Tool for FetLife alleges abuse on the part of a FetLife Carebear:
Screenshot of a Predator Alert Tool for FetLife report made against a FetLife “carebear” (an on-staff moderator).
It reads, in full:

Fetlife caretaker FAIL. This lady could see that I was being harassed and not only failed to help me, but suspended my fetlife account when I screencapped the abusive crap I was being messaged with to show people, and then issued fake copyright violation notices to get the evidence removed from being hosted. Fetlife do not care if you get abused, they do care to make sure no-one knows about it.

Anyone familiar with my work already knows that FetLife used numerous improper copyright violation notices (DMCA takedown notices) to try to wipe Predator Alert Tool for FetLife off the face of the Internet, and failed. I even sent FetLife an application to become a Caretaker touting how familiar I was with the process of DMCA notice and counter-notice (which I credit them for forcing my hand to educate myself about). For more than a year now, FetLife’s been smart enough to stop engaging with me.
But this report is interesting. Firstly, it’s a good idea. Report the site admins. I should’ve thought of that earlier.
More importantly, however, this showcases exactly why the Predator Alert Tool suite is what we actually really need: the “report abuse” button on websites shouldn’t go to the site admins, it should go to the rest of the user community.

maymay:

The most recent report filed in the Predator Alert Tool for FetLife alleges abuse on the part of a FetLife Carebear:

Screenshot of a Predator Alert Tool for FetLife report made against a FetLife “carebear” (an on-staff moderator).

It reads, in full:

Fetlife caretaker FAIL. This lady could see that I was being harassed and not only failed to help me, but suspended my fetlife account when I screencapped the abusive crap I was being messaged with to show people, and then issued fake copyright violation notices to get the evidence removed from being hosted. Fetlife do not care if you get abused, they do care to make sure no-one knows about it.

Anyone familiar with my work already knows that FetLife used numerous improper copyright violation notices (DMCA takedown notices) to try to wipe Predator Alert Tool for FetLife off the face of the Internet, and failed. I even sent FetLife an application to become a Caretaker touting how familiar I was with the process of DMCA notice and counter-notice (which I credit them for forcing my hand to educate myself about). For more than a year now, FetLife’s been smart enough to stop engaging with me.

But this report is interesting. Firstly, it’s a good idea. Report the site admins. I should’ve thought of that earlier.

More importantly, however, this showcases exactly why the Predator Alert Tool suite is what we actually really need: the “report abuse” button on websites shouldn’t go to the site admins, it should go to the rest of the user community.

ztvf7jsh8a
Mon May 12
maymay:

eveamedeus:

maymay:

As some of you may already be aware, I’ve been working on the next Predator Alert Tool project. This time, it’s for Twitter.
Here is an annotated teaser screenshot showing the current working prototype of Predator Alert Tool for Twitter I’m hacking on tonight.
Predator Alert Tool for Twitter is the first fully decentralized (unhosted), yet still peer-to-peer capable Predator Alert Tool. Like the other PATs, it will be 100% free to use forever and the source code will be placed into the public domain (once I’m ready to release the initial version). Here are some of the core features visible on this one screenshot:
The Predator Alert Tool for Twitter integrates cleanly into Twitter’s own Web interface. No separate app to use. Once installed, just use Twitter.com as you normally would.
You gain two new types of lists in addition to regular Twitter Lists: a “Twitter Blocklist” and any number of “warnlists.”
Your Twitter Blocklist shows you all of the Twitter users you’ve blocked in one place.
Your warnlists are where you publish your “Predator Alerts” and where you subscribe to Predator Alerts from others. If a tweet shows in any of your timelines from a user who is on a warnlist you’ve subscribed to, their tweet gets “redboxed.” In infamous Predator Alert Tool style, click through to that user’s profile to read details of each alert published about that user.

Unlike regular Twitter Lists, Twitter users can not remove themselves from Predator Alert Tool warnlists that you add them to, and taking a page from Predator Alert Tool for Facebook‘s book, you can add users you have blocked or users who have blocked you to warnlists that you make.
Subscribe to alerts from sources you trust. You always have the final say; as a fully decentralized system, unlike the Block Bot, this system offers no ability for others to moderate what you publish and thus it has a vastly reduced vulnerability to corruption by social cliques and their inevitable groupthink.
TL;DR? It’s like saying “fuck you” but with more JavaScript.
There’s more to show off but ultimately this isn’t ready to go live yet, so I’ll leave it at that.
This tool is by far the most technologically interesting Predator Alert Tool I’ve written so far. (The others were socioculturally fascinating but technologically boring.) That also means it’s coming along relatively slowly, because I have to rethink and relearn what I think I know about computer programming. Meanwhile, I also have to do things like sleep and eat.
If you like this idea, please spread the word; I have no interest in ownership. Mimesis matters more than attribution. So if you think you can implement a system like this better or faster than I can, what the fuck are you doing reading this instead of implementing it?
But if you’d rather support me in continuing to work on this myself, please remember that I am currently homeless and your donations of stuff like food REALLY matter. Turns out writing code burns calories. My government told me they don’t think I deserve to eat. What do you think?

I AM 10000% ON BOARD WITH THIS. I’m making a Whole Foods gift card donation to the “maymay’s gotta eat” fund RIGHT NOW. No joke. (Check your email, may.)

:D Thank you so much the donation and the public support! <3 <3 <3!

maymay:

eveamedeus:

maymay:

As some of you may already be aware, I’ve been working on the next Predator Alert Tool project. This time, it’s for Twitter.

Here is an annotated teaser screenshot showing the current working prototype of Predator Alert Tool for Twitter I’m hacking on tonight.

Predator Alert Tool for Twitter is the first fully decentralized (unhosted), yet still peer-to-peer capable Predator Alert Tool. Like the other PATs, it will be 100% free to use forever and the source code will be placed into the public domain (once I’m ready to release the initial version). Here are some of the core features visible on this one screenshot:

  • The Predator Alert Tool for Twitter integrates cleanly into Twitter’s own Web interface. No separate app to use. Once installed, just use Twitter.com as you normally would.
  • You gain two new types of lists in addition to regular Twitter Lists: a “Twitter Blocklist” and any number of “warnlists.”
    • Your Twitter Blocklist shows you all of the Twitter users you’ve blocked in one place.
    • Your warnlists are where you publish your “Predator Alerts” and where you subscribe to Predator Alerts from others. If a tweet shows in any of your timelines from a user who is on a warnlist you’ve subscribed to, their tweet gets “redboxed.” In infamous Predator Alert Tool style, click through to that user’s profile to read details of each alert published about that user.
  • Unlike regular Twitter Lists, Twitter users can not remove themselves from Predator Alert Tool warnlists that you add them to, and taking a page from Predator Alert Tool for Facebook‘s book, you can add users you have blocked or users who have blocked you to warnlists that you make.
  • Subscribe to alerts from sources you trust. You always have the final say; as a fully decentralized system, unlike the Block Bot, this system offers no ability for others to moderate what you publish and thus it has a vastly reduced vulnerability to corruption by social cliques and their inevitable groupthink.

TL;DR? It’s like saying “fuck you” but with more JavaScript.

There’s more to show off but ultimately this isn’t ready to go live yet, so I’ll leave it at that.

This tool is by far the most technologically interesting Predator Alert Tool I’ve written so far. (The others were socioculturally fascinating but technologically boring.) That also means it’s coming along relatively slowly, because I have to rethink and relearn what I think I know about computer programming. Meanwhile, I also have to do things like sleep and eat.

If you like this idea, please spread the word; I have no interest in ownership. Mimesis matters more than attribution. So if you think you can implement a system like this better or faster than I can, what the fuck are you doing reading this instead of implementing it?

But if you’d rather support me in continuing to work on this myself, please remember that I am currently homeless and your donations of stuff like food REALLY matter. Turns out writing code burns calories. My government told me they don’t think I deserve to eat. What do you think?

I AM 10000% ON BOARD WITH THIS.
I’m making a Whole Foods gift card donation to the “maymay’s gotta eat” fund RIGHT NOW. No joke. (Check your email, may.)

:D Thank you so much the donation and the public support! <3 <3 <3!

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Sat May 10

Public Service Announcement for People Who Use The Internet

maymay:

You are not anonymous.

When you leave a comment filled with rape apologia on my blog under a name like “Sarah” but you leave trails (like an email address) which links to a Facebook profile claiming to be a man by the name of “Alec Brice-Bateman,” I can trivially learn more about you than you apparently want me to know:

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Even if you think you’re covering your tracks, I can and will still find you. There are so many ways; IP addresses, browser fingerprinting, timing, or just your friends’ comments even if you did everything perfectly. Put simply: I am better at this than you are.

However, it is no fun when it is this easy for me to call you out by name as a rape apologist scumbag:

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Try harder, dipshits.

See also:

End of transmission.